Facility Accommodations

First Floor

Room Theater Capacity Classroom Capacity Round Table Capacity Dimensions Square Footage

Ballroom

1376

1376

1376

 

21,670

  A

420

416

416

68' x 102'

6,558

  B

470

468

471

68' x 110'

7,538

  C

486

480

485

68' x 130'

7,574

The Foundry

414

414

400

 

6,110

  A

208

207

192

56' x 56'

2,990

  B

208

207

192

59' x 56'

3,120

South Exhibit Hall

 

 

 

111' x 287'

31,315

Center Exhibit Hall

 

 

 

112' x 64'

7,802

North Exhibit Hall

 

 

 

109' x 154'

15,865

Meeting Room 101

80

78

 

33' x 42'

1,300

Meeting Room 102

80

78

 

33' x 42'

1,300

Meeting Room 103

94

94

 

40' x 35'

1,412

Meeting Room 104

119

114

 

32' x 56'

1,810

Interior Pre-Function

 

 

 

 

29,336

Exterior Pre-Function (Balcony)

 

 

 

 

20,060



Second Floor

Room Theater Capacity Classroom Capacity Round Table Capacity Dimensions Square Footage

Dining Gallery

590

590

592

112' x 79'

8,830

Sycamore Room

526

528

520

 

8,060

  A

124

124

120

40' x 46'

1,930

  B

140

140

128

39' x 46'

1,892

  C

124

124

120

40' x 51'

2,140

  D

140

140

128

39' x 51'

2,098

Meeting Room 201

54

48

 

26' x 32'

787

Meeting Room 202

41

34

 

26' x 28'

704

Meeting Room 203

80

80

 

26' x 48'

1,204

Meeting Room 204

76

75

 

32' x 36'

1,147

Meeting Room 205

160

160

144

45' x 58'

2,583

Meeting Room 206

76

75

 

32' x 36'

1,168

Meeting Room 207

50

47

 

26' x 32'

780

Meeting Room 208

50

47

 

26' x 32'

772

Meeting Room 209

80

78

 

26' x 48'

1,177

Meeting Room 210

54

48

 

26' x 34'

827

Meeting Room 211

144

140

 

51' x 44'

2,168

Meeting Room 212

84

72

 

33' x 44'

1,385

Meeting Room 213

84

72

80

33' x 44'

1,385

Interior Pre-Function

 

 

 

 

11,320

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A Brief History

The Columbus Iron Works was located on the banks of the Chattahoochee River in the Columbus Historic District. Organized in 1853, it was built near the steamboat landing in the heart of the growing community. Today the buildings are a local landmark in the downtown area and houses the Columbus Georgia Convention and Trade Center. Nearby are first-class sleeping accommodations, restaurants, and entertainment facilities.

The Columbus Iron Works produced a variety of equipment on this site for over a century. Aside from farming implements and mechanical gears used by local textile businesses, it produced firearms for the Confederacy during the Civil War. It also produced machinery to drive at least fourteen naval vessels in the Confederate fleet.

In the early 1970’s the company had substantially outgrown the old buildings and moved to new facilities on the outskirts of town. In 1975 the City of Columbus became involved with the buildings. Plans were formulated for a downtown convention center and this building has potential to serve in that capacity. Through a careful blending of the old and new, the Columbus Georgia Convention and Trade Center was created.

The massive structures of the Iron Works appear little changed from the last century. The old brick walls, huge timbers and exposed ceilings, representing the best of 19th century craftsmanship, create an ambience unknown to modern construction.

The building has over 182,000 square feet of floor space with the 17 meeting rooms satisfying a variety of needs and seating as many as 500 or as few as 20. All spaces provide the most modern lighting, and staging equipment are also available. The Trade Center houses a new state-of-the art on-site kitchen with the capacity and staff to prepare up to 4,000 meals at a time. There is also a concession area available for trade shows, located between the exhibit halls.

Loading dock facilities allow an easy entrance to the exhibit halls for booth setups. Ramps and elevators also make the Trade Center accessible to persons with disabilities.

Sheltered access is provided to both levels of the complex from a 426 car, multi-level garage. In addition to the garage, ground level parking lots are located around the complex perimeter.

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